SaltwaterCentral - Quit Fishing ~ Start Catching - SaltwaterCentral.Com

Register for FREE to Use our Offshore Fishing Resources
Select State -
Staff Online:
SaltwaterCentral - Quit Fishing ~ Start Catching - SaltwaterCentral.Com
SaltwaterCentral - Quit Fishing ~ Start Catching - SaltwaterCentral.Com
SaltwaterCentral - Quit Fishing ~ Start Catching - SaltwaterCentral.Com
December 19, 2018 1:10 am EST
Location: 33.436N 77.743W
Wind Dir: NE (50°)
Wind Speed: 10 knots
Wind Gust: 14 knots
AT Ps: 30.16 in (1021.2 mb)
Air Temp: 58°F (14.3°C)
Dew Point: 48°F (8.7°C)
Water Temp: 60°F (15.3°C)

SaltwaterCentral - Quit Fishing ~ Start Catching - SaltwaterCentral.Com


The harvest of brown shrimp in the western Gulf of Mexico is expected to be 44.2 million pounds, which is above the predicted value for the last two years yet below the historical 56-year average of 56.2 million pounds, according to NOAA’s annual forecast. The prediction covers the period from July 2017 through June 2018 for state and federal waters off Louisiana and federal waters off Texas.

However, sustained high catch rates and size composition in mid-June (the end of our monitoring survey) indicate continued strong recruitment.  Moreover, the 2017 Environmental Model showed favorable conditions in the bay system and predicts above average production for Texas offshore waters.

Texas and Louisiana experienced a mild winter along with record high temperatures documented in spring.  Rainfall and salinity throughout Galveston Bay this year has been near the historical average. Moderate salinities combined with strong, consistent southerly winds have increased available nursery area and allowed for the greater distribution of juvenile shrimp.

NOAA scientists make the annual prediction of brown shrimp catches based on monitoring of juvenile brown shrimp abundance, growth estimates and environmental indicators. They predict shrimp catches for state and federal waters off Louisiana from west of the Mississippi River to the Texas-Louisiana border to be approximately 21.7 million pounds this season. The Texas portion of the catch is predicted to be 22.5 million pounds.

Sixty percent of the shrimp harvested in the U.S. comes from the Gulf of Mexico, especially Texas and Louisiana. Total domestic shrimp harvest brought in $488.3 million in 2015.

Young brown shrimp begin entering estuaries in Texas and western Louisiana in mid-February and continue through July, with peak recruitment occurring from February through early April.

A wide array of environmental and biological factors affects the fate of young shrimp entering the estuaries.  Three environmental variables: temperature, salinity, and tidal height, have been correlated with subsequent shrimp production.

Juvenile brown shrimp abundance and growth estimates are obtained by monitoring the inshore commercial shrimp fisheries in Texas and the inshore and nearshore fisheries in Louisiana. Data for these forecasts are obtained from NOAA Fisheries Galveston Laboratory, NOAA port agents, NOAA’s National Climatic Data and Weather Centers, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the commercial shrimp industry.

NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth’s environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources.

 

Last 30 NOAA Fisheries Articles

NOAA predicts the season for commercial harvest of brown shrimp

Reduction in the Gulf of Mexico Vermilion Snapper Annual Catch Limit

Nominate Outstanding Steward in Coastal and Marine Habitat Conservation

Discussion: Recreational Fishing for Red Snapper - the 2018 Season

Limited Opening of Recreational and Commercial Red Snapper Fishery

Proposed Rule to Revise Annual Catch Limits for South Atlantic Red Grouper

2017 Bluefin Tuna Fishing Year Summary January 1, 2017 December 31, 2017

Mid-Atlantic Council to Offer Training Workshops on...

NOAA Names Michael Pentony to Lead Greater Atlantic Region

New Trade Rule Combats Illegal, Fraudulent Seafood





Imports of Highly Migratory Species Covered By Seafood Import Monitoring Program

Atlantic Highly Migratory Species MRIP Working Group Releases Regional Implement

NOAA Fisheries Closes Atlantic Bluefin Tuna Fishery on December 6, 2017

Atlantic Highly Migratory Species

SOUTH ATLANTIC FISHERY BULLETIN

Commercial Landings of Bluefin Tuna As of September 30, 2017

NOAA Fisheries Requests Comments on the Issuance of Exempted Fishing Permits...

Atlantic Bluefin Tuna General Category Fishery: NMFS Transfers 156.4 mt...

Atlantic Bluefin Tuna General Category Fishery: NMFS Adjusts Daily Retention...

Atlantic Swordfish Landings Update: Commercial and Recreational

CHRIS OLIVER SELECTED AS NOAA FISHERIES ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR

NOAA Fishery Announces the Federal Gulf of Mexico Greater Amberjack Recreationa

New Tool Helps Oyster Growers Prepare for Changing Ocean Chemistry

Final Call for MAFAC Nominations

NOAA Fisheries Announces Atlantic Surfclam and Ocean Quahog Catch Limits for 20

Leftist anti fishing Ocean over stating findings

Commercial and recreational saltwater fishing generated $214 billion in 2014

NOAA Fisheries hosts public meetings in April to discuss potential skimmer trawl

NOAA Fisheries Announces the Atlantic Migratory Group (Georgia to New York) Cobi

Seasonal Prohibition on Fishing for and Possession of Red, Black, Tiger, Yellowf